The Center for Hellenic Studies

Classics@ Journal

Classical scholarship that engages issues of great significance to a wide range of cultural and scholarly concerns

Classics@19: Conversations on Hellenism; Sharing insights on the Poeti Vaganti project

This issue of Classic@ focuses on selected themes that revolve around the phenomenon of the itinerant professionals of performing arts and run along it, in a way that shows the osmotic levels set in motion by such research. This issue is the result of a dynamic process: two workshops, as a twofold thematic series, were held at the Department of Classics, “La Sapienza” University, between the Fall and the Spring Term 2020/2021, with MA students in Greek Epigraphy and with doctoral students in History and Philology of the Ancient World. Read more …

Classics@18: Ancient Manuscripts and Virtual Research Environments

This volume of Classics@ explores and analyses a methodological turn in ancient studies: the practice of presenting harvested data in ancient manuscripts within virtual research environments (VREs). What changes when research on ancient manuscripts occurs in a VRE, especially in early Jewish and Christian literature, New Testament, and Classical works? Does it matter if we undertake research in a digital medium rather than in a traditional print context? Read more …

Handling Big Manuscript Data

Elpida Perdiki and Maria Konstantinidou This contribution describes a series of Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) tests performed on medieval Greek…

Classics@17: Digital Literacies

This volume of Classics@ aims to explore and analyze how the present digital turn enables a renewed theoretical engagement with multimodal ancient literacies. Cultural transmission in Antiquity was primarily oral, supplemented by images and texts. Nevertheless, Classicists first employed the term “literacy” in the singular, according to its 19th-century definition: the ability to read and write texts. Read more …

Classics@16: Seven Essays on Sappho

These seven papers are the product of a graduate seminar led by Gregory Nagy at Harvard in the fall of 2016, entitled ‘Sappho and her Songmaking’. The scope of the seminar was wide-ranging, encompassing philological, linguistic, historical, anthropological, comparative, and reception-based approaches to the great female poet of antiquity. Read more …

Classics@15: A Concise Inventory of Greek Etymology

Edited by Olga Levaniouk Foreword A concise inventory of Greek etymologies (CIGE) is an ongoing publication that will be expanded and revised as time goes on. This project’s goal is to provide access to etymologies that are important for the study of Greek culture and that are often not yet… Read More

Classics@14: Singers and Tales in the 21st Century; The Legacies of Milman Parry and Albert Lord

2010 marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of Albert Lord's seminal Singer of Tales, and the 75th anniversary of the death of his mentor Milman Parry, the originator of what has come to be known as the Oral-Formulaic Theory. In honor of the work and continuing influence of these two pathfinding scholars, Read more …

Classics@13: Greek Poetry and Sport

Many studies on Pindar, Homer, and other poets have discussed the specific uses of sport in each context, and studies on Greek sport have acknowledged the ways in which agonistic values and practices have been reflected in poetic literature, but there has been no single collection of studies devoted specifically to the intersection of Greek poetry and sport. The volume includes a range of contributors who represent a diversity of genres, periods and approaches. Read more …

Classics@12: Comparative Approaches to India and Greece

Papers Gregory Nagy, Professor of Classics, Harvard University, and Director of the Center for Hellenic Studies, “Mentalities of sacrifice in Indic and Greek traditions.” Shubha Pathak, Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy and Religion, American University, “Why People Need Epics: Terming and Learning from the Divine Yet Human.” Douglas… Read More

Classics@11: The Rhetoric of Abuse in Greek Literature

This volume grew out of the frustration the editor encountered after talking to colleagues who were interested in exploring abuse in ancient Greek literature. Though they seemed to share similar perspectives on the importance of abuse in Greek literature, there didn’t seem to be a venue for us to engage in a collaborative project on this topic. Read more …

Classics@10: Historical Poetics in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Greece; Essays in Honor of Lily Macrakis.

The relationship of history and art is the theme of the essays by distinguished international scholars collected in this volume. Its publication celebrates the career and work of Professor Lily Macrakis. She is an eminent chronicler of modern Greek history whose seminal work,  Read more …

List of Contributors

Roderick Beaton is Koraes Professor of Modern Greek and Byzantine History, Language and Literature and Head of the Department of Byzantine…

Classics@9: Defense Mechanisms in Interdisciplinary Approaches to Classical Studies and Beyond

The aim of this volume is to publish online research papers and essays in Classics and in other disciplines, related or unrelated, that explore strategies where the primary purpose is to defend assertively rather than attack. The justification is straightforward: discoveries and discovery procedures in research require and deserve a reasoned defense. Read more …

Classics@8: A Homer commentary in progress

The intellectual goal of A Homer commentary in progress is simple and at the same time most ambitious: of all existing commentaries on Homeric poetry, ours is the first and only such commentary that is based squarely on the cumulative research of Milman Parry and his student, Albert Lord, who created a new way of thinking about Homeric poetry. Read more …

Classics@7: Les femmes, le féminin et le politique après Nicole Loraux, Colloque de Paris (INHA), novembre 2007

The papers in this issue of Classics@ were originally presented at a conference held in Paris in November 2007, which was co-organized by Centre Louis Gernet (CNRS-EHESS), the Équipe Phéacie (Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne et Université Denis-Diderot Paris VII) and the Réseau National Interuniversitaire sur le Genre (RING, Paris). The aim was to explore Nicole Loraux’s legacy concerning the feminine and the polis both in Hellenic Studies and in feminist scholarship. Read more …

Conclusions

« Les femmes, généralement en groupe, interviennent dans les moments de crise aiguë où l’existence de la cité est remise en…

Classics@6: Reflecting on the Greek Epic Cycle

The core of this issue of Classics@ comes from a conference held in Ancient Olympia on 9–10 July 2010, which was co-organized by the Center for Hellenic Studies (Harvard University) and the Centre for the Study of Myth and Religion in Greek and Roman Antiquity (University of Patras). The goal of the conference was to explore problems concerning the surviving fragments of the Greek Epic Cycle that have heretofore been neglected. Read more …

Classics@5: Derveni Papyrus Conference Proceedings

In July, 2008, the Center for Hellenic Studies hosted a three-day symposium on the Derveni Papyrus in light of the recent publication of the edition by Theokritos Kouremenos, George M. Parássoglou, and Kyriakos Tsantsanoglou (Florence, Olschki, 2006). The symposium was an opportunity to gather scholars who in the course of the past decades have been working on this text to address a set of issues relating to the edition and integration of the papyrus, its translation, and its interpretation. Several papers from the symposium are made available here. Read more …

Classics@4: The New Sappho on Old Age; Textual and Philosophical Issues

Guest editors: Ellen Greene and Marilyn Skinner [In order to help prevent the looting of objects collected as samples of material culture, the Center for Hellenic Studies supports (1) the statement of the 1970 UNESCO convention with reference to the illicit trafficking in cultural property, (2) the code of ethics… Read More

Introduction

Papyrological finds, no matter how momentous for papyrologists and other specialists studying the ancient world, ordinarily do not make international…

Classics@3: The Homerizon; Conceptual Interrogations in Homeric Studies

The organizers' wanted to investigate quite simply: throughout history, what does it mean to "do Homer"? The scholars who attended were openly invited to take a broader view of the issue of Homer than that fought out in the usual philological and archaeological venues. Read more …

Classics@2: Ancient Mediterranean Cultural Informatics

The papers published in this volume of Classics@ directly resulted from a workshop that was designed to bring together a group of scholars interested in the possibilities afforded by the electronic manipulation of texts, and particularly how current standards — XML, XSLT, and Unicode, to name a few — can help us create, analyse, connect, and share the materials with which we work. Read more …

Preface

As Director of the Center for Hellenic Studies, I have dedicated myself to keeping alive the Center’s original mission, as …

Classics@1, Issue 2: Women and Property

The collection of papers published in this volume derive from a colloquium held at the Center for Hellenic Studies in August 2003, which brought together scholars of ancient Greece, the Levant, Egypt, and Mesopotamia in order to initiate cross-cultural study and cross-disciplinary exchange focusing on free women as active participants in the control of property … Read more …

Classics@1, Issue 1: New Epigrams Attributed to Posidippus of Pella

The guest editors of the first issue of Classics@ have constructed an in-progress working document of the Posidippus text first established by Bastianini-Gallazzi in the Italian editio princeps. While based ultimately on the editio princeps and, partly, on the editio minor, this text continues to be re-thought in light of ongoing restorations proposed in publications and general communication among Classics scholars. Read more …

Contribute to the Project

Readers of Classics@ are invited to contribute new readings, conjectures, observations, translations, and textual criticism to the CHS Posidippus Page.

Text of the Posidippus Epigrams

New Poems Attributed to Posidippus: An Electronic Text-in progress Revised and periodically updated by Benjamin Acosta-Hughes (University of Michigan), Elizabeth…

Further Resources

The list of Further Resources on this page is broken down into the following sections. Publishers…

Translations

Each of the epigrams in the papyrus (P.Mil.Vogl. VIII 309) is represented here by at least one translation into English…